The Day Between

barred-door

It’s a little late to be posting this, but as I sit here awake in the middle of the night, I find myself wondering about the apostles on this same night some 1,970 years ago. How many of them were having problems sleeping? Jesus had been crucified the day before. He wouldn’t raise agin until tomorrow. In between that was a long and lonely Saturday where it seemed all hope had been lost.

A Fearful Day

Between the gospel accounts, we see that some visited His grave, like Mary and Martha. Others, like the disciples in John 20:19, were in hiding, fearful of what might happen to them. Of course, these things happened after the Sabbath Day, on the Sunday when Jesus would rise from the grave. The Bible is conspicuously silent about Saturday, but, based on the events leading up to the cross and what we see after, one thing is clear: many of Jesus’ closest followers had lost hope.

When the mob took Jesus away from Galilee, pretty much all of the apostles scatter. Peter follows at a distance, but he then goes on to deny any association with Jesus. The only apostle we see near the cross is John. Even after the apostles reunite and Jesus appears among them, Thomas still doubts — Thomas who once pledged to die with Jesus. They had lost sight of Jesus’ promises. They had lost sight of His hope.

Waiting for His Return

We too live in a day between our Savior’s departure and His return. Each of the gospel accounts ends with Christ lifting into the sky. He departs this world to return to Heaven, but we have promises that He will return.

“Men of Galilee, they said. “why do you stand here looking into the sky? This same Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will come back in the same way you have seen him go into heaven.”

Acts 1:11 (right after Jesus’ ascension)

“Repent, then, and turn to God, so that your sins may be wiped out, that times of refreshing may come from the Lord, and that he may send the Christ, who has been appointed for you — even Jesus. He must remain in heaven until the time comes for God to restore everything, as he promised long ago through his holy prophets.”

Acts 3:19-21

When Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with him in glory.

Colossians 3:4

He who testifies to these things says, “Yes, I am coming soon.” Amen, Come, Lord Jesus. The grace of the Lord Jesus be with God’s people. Amen.

Revelation 22:20-21

And there are several more passages like these. Our Savior has risen, and we await His return. But the challenge to us is the same as to those first disciples the day before the Resurrection — to not lose faith, hope, or sight while we wait.

Keeping Perspective

When Jesus appeared before the apostles, how foolish do you think they felt for being so fearful the day before? Likewise, how foolish will we feel when the Lord returns, and we realize how much time and energy we’ve spent focusing purely on the things of this world? Sure, we have longer to wait than the apostles, but, in the context of eternity, this life will seem no more than a day — a day where we either waited on the Lord or a day where we let the cares and concerns of this world choke Him out of our lives.

Those early disciples were legitimately fearful that the Jewish leaders would have them killed as they had Jesus. Likewise, the concerns of this life can feel equally legitimate and immediate, but they don’t have to rule us. Fears stoked by politicians, by health struggles, by tragedies, by terror — these are all tools of the devil to keep our eyes planted on the here and now rather than the hereafter. They can cause us to lock ourselves up spiritually. They can make us forget the promises we have.

Instead, let’s learn from the mistakes of our spiritual forebears. Let’s keep focused on our hope and faith. Let’s keep our eyes on Christ’s promises. Let’s stay focused on His return. That should then put everything else in perspective. It should break the locks on our hearts. It should drive fear away, and that enables us to then live like Him and tell others about Him. We should be living with a hope that none can take away. We don’t know when our Lord will return, but that doesn’t matter. What matters is that we are ready.

For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all men, instructing us to the intent that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we would live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world; looking for the blessed hope and appearing of the glory of the great God and our Savior, Jesus Christ; who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify to himself a people for his own possession, zealous for good works.

Titus 2:11 – 14

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